Green Heat in Greenspaces - Scotland

All GHiGs datasets cover the whole of Scotland and have been derived by Greenspace Scotland over the project period of September 2020 to April 2021. Principal third party data suppliers include:

  • Ordnance Survey (greenspace and water body data)

  • Scottish Government (Scotland’s Heat Map)

  • Energy Saving Trust (Home Analytics)

Please reference the Data Guide and Methodology report (attached to the metadata record as an associated resource) and send any further queries on the quality/ accuracy of the data to parkpower@greenspacescotland.org.uk.

GHiGs Settlements:

A public summary of indicators for GHiGs analysis of low carbon heat based on data aggregated to Scotland’s 516 settlements. Settlement boundaries are from 2012 derived from National Records of Scotland to be consistent with those used by Scotland’s Heat Map v.2. Settlements are defined as places with populations greater than 500. Approximately 90% of Scotland’s population lives in settlements. It is not clear why Scotland’s Heat Map is using the NRS 2012 settlement boundaries rather than the more recent NRS 2016 settlement boundaries. Attributes were derived from Scotland’s Heat Map with additional attributes from GHiGs analysis and EST Home Analytics

GHiGs Settlements by LA:

A more comprehensive spreadsheet of tables used for National Findings Report and all indicators for GHiGs analysis of low carbon heat based on data aggregated to Scotland’s 516 settlements and, separately, the 32 Local Authorities. Settlement data aggregated to Local Authority geographies and presented based on OS BoundaryLine Local Authority boundaries. The data excludes areas outside settlements and therefore does NOT represent figures for complete local authorities. This is particularly evident for Local Authorities with more significant populations and businesses located outside of settlements. It includes most indicators used in the GHiGs National Findings report based on analysis of low carbon heat related data aggregated to Scotland’s 516 settlements and then aggregated to 32 Local Authorities.

GHiGs greenspaces:

Boundaries derived from OS Mastermap Greenspace. Attributes derived from Scotland’s Heat Map v.2 with additional attributes from GHiGs analysis (see our Methodology Report) and EST Home Analytics

GHiGs strategic greenspaces:

Subset of GHiGs Greenspaces based on selection criteria to identify the 3% (3,446) of national greenspace sites with high potential for supply of ground source heat (based on areal size / capacity) and have been classified as ‘high’ based on local linear heat density. These sites are likely to be the strongest candidates for larger scale ground source heat solutions, potentially storing and feeding low grade heat into low carbon district heat networks. The ‘GSHP_Strategic_Importance’ indicator category of ‘VERY HIGH’ was used to select this subset

GHiGs static water bodies:

Relatively static water bodies greater than 1000m2 in area in proximity to urban settlements including canals, lochs, lakes, flooded quarries/pits etc. derived largely from OS Mastermap Greenspace. This data does not include rivers.

GHiGs DHN highest viability (Linear Heat Density 16000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll to highlight areas where District Heat Networks (DHNs) have highest viability based on heat demand from all buildings. Areas identifies have high levels of heat demand density and are therefore highly suitable for DHNs – source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs DHN high viability (Linear Heat Density 8000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll to highlight areas where District Heat Networks (DHNs) have high viability based on heat demand from all buildings – source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs DHN viable (Linear Heat Density 4000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll to highlight areas where District Heat Networks (DHNs) are viable based on heat demand from all buildings. Threshold of 4000 is widely used across the industry for Linear Heat Density modelling to identify areas with DHN viability. Polygons of area less than 250m2 were deleted which reduced the number of polygon features by 80% to cut file size. Source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs DHN highest viability public buildings only (Linear Heat Density 16000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll based on a best estimate of public buildings to highlight areas where District Heat Networks have highest viable based on heat demand from only public buildings. Source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs DHN high viability public buildings only (Linear Heat Density 8000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll based on a best estimate of public buildings to highlight areas where District Heat Networks have high viability based on heat demand from only public buildings. Source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs DHN viable public buildings only (Linear Heat Density 4000 kWh/m/yr):

Linear Heat Density model created by Ramboll based on a best estimate of public buildings to highlight areas where District Heat Networks are viable based on heat demand from only public buildings. Threshold of 4000 is widely used across the industry for Linear Heat Density modelling to identify areas with DHN viability – source of heat demand data: Scotland’s Heat Map v2.

GHiGs public buildings:

Subset of Scotland’s Heat Map at building level where buildings are assessed as likely to be publicly owned based on a selection of 125 OS AddressBase codes (see GHiGs Methodology report for details). This is the best available approximation of publicly owned buildings but will exclude those publicly owned buildings which are leased to third parties for more commercial-type services. This same identification method was the basis for creating the 3 Linear Heat Density map layers for public buildings only.

GHiGs public buildings with heat demand greater than 50 MWh/year:

Subset of ‘GHiGs public buildings’ dataset based on a filter for all those public buildings with an annual heat demand of 50 MWh or more. Multi-occupancy buildings like flatted properties are treated as separate buildings and therefore they are unlikely to appear in this dataset.

GHiGs public buildings (>200 MWh) near greenspaces (>200 MWh):

Subset of ‘GHiGs public buildings’ dataset where: (1) buildings are assessed as likely to be publicly owned based on a selection of 125 OS AddressBase codes and have a heat demand of at least 200 MWh; AND (2) they are located within 50m of a greenspace that, based on 20% space utilisation, could meet at least 200 MWh in terms of heat production from its available area. In effect this is a subset of public building locations that offers the strongest opportunities for larger scale GSHP projects based on use of nearby greenspace. Multi-occupancy buildings like flatted properties are treated as separate buildings and therefore examples such as high rise flats next to larger areas of greenspace are unlikely to appear in this dataset.

GHiGs waste disposal sites:

Potential sources of waste heat from waste disposal sites to feed into district heat networks – source: SEPA registered waste sites

All GHiGs datasets cover Scotland and have been derived over the project period of September 2020 to April 2021. Principal third party data suppliers include: • Ordnance Survey (greenspace and water body data) • Scottish Government (Scotland’s Heat Map) • Energy Saving Trust (Home Analytics)

Data

Data Provided by

Greenspace Scotland

License

Other (Not Open)

Updated

2021-08-10

Created

2021-06-16

alternative_name

ghigs

lineage

This dataset was created by Greenspace Scotland before upload to Spatial Hub Please contact spatialhub@improvementservice.org.uk for more details.

ssdi_link

www.spatialdata.gov.scot

update_frequency

not planned